A PHOTO

Some yellow buttons, some confusing labels, and some even more confusing questions. Hard to do better.

A PHOTO

Maybe not the most fancy looking, but probably the most userfriendly ticket dispenser I’ve seen (NYC underground)

A PHOTO

"No coffee"? Really?

(ok, it refers to the grey tray, but still)
A PHOTO

You may wonder what the efficiency of this advertisement is.

A PHOTO

One of the worst user interfaces I’ve seen, at the entrance of the local recycling park. The card reader doesn’t scan from a distance, so you actually have to figure out where the scanner is located, which is not clear, and then hold your card firmly against it.
The screen looks like a touch screen, but it isn’t. There are buttons on the left and the right in the same color/material as the frame which makes them rather hard to recognize. The marks “1x” and “2x” just add to the confusion.
Also, the screen is almost impossible to read as soon as there is a bit of sunshine.

After entering the data you’re also asked to drive a little bit backwards so the car can be weighed properly.

A PHOTO

And another example of a QR code with a likely “click through rate” of 0.

A PHOTO

One of the worst QR code implementations I’ve seen, in my hometown Gent moreover. Very little contrast, very small, and part of the pavement. Tried scanning it from a 30cm distance. Didn’t work and I looked like an idiot.

Would have been cool though if only it was done properly.

A PHOTO

Unless you expect people to like sitting on their knees at a bus stop just to scan a QR code, the position/size make the code totally useless.

A QUOTE

Only people who question the status quo can change it.